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Head of the Class

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SARINA VASTA

Three summers ago, I began searching for a teaching job. I was fresh out of college, certified in almost every state; (thanks to an Interstate Certification Agreement) and ready to prove myself as a teacher. I completed and responded to what felt like 50 different jobs, wrote specific cover letters and reached out to all the connections I knew. On top of all this, I had passed up a part time job at one of my favorite schools to move back home and pursue a job while save money. It was the most stressful and frustrating experience. Thoughts constantly flew between keeping my head down and staying with the job search to moments where I wanted (and sometimes did) throw my hands in the air and wondering why I wasn't hearing back. Finally, I saw an advertisement in the local Pennysaver for a Special Education job at a private preschool near my house. I applied without hesitation, even though preschool was not within my certification perimeters and kept my fingers crossed for any sign of hope. A week later, I did hear back, offering an interview! Yes! I went on the interview, really liked the school and the people I met. A week after that, I received a call saying there was not a teaching position available but that if I wanted, they would keep my information for when a classroom opened up. I was so disappointed. I felt so close to getting a job and now it was taken away. Still, the job search continued as my anxiety grew because September seemed just around the corner (and it was). A week before school started, I received a phone call from the preschool asking if I wanted to pursue a job as a Certified Teaching Assistant; one step below a teacher, with the promise that if a classroom opened up, it would be mine. Considering my options (at that point, lack thereof), I accepted the position. Three years later, I will be starting my third year at the preschool. A classroom opened up that December and I have had my own room for the past 19 months (we have a six week summer program). It feels unreal. I wish I could tell myself three years ago that this is how it would play out, that the stress and anxiety wasn't worth it but the constant push for a job was. In hindsight it's given me the mentality that everything truly does happen for a reason. I couldn't be happier about my job and everyday I am blessed to work with the children I do.